Bamboozled: Man writes check then cancels it, but Wells Fargo honors it anyway. What gives?

Anthony Nardiello has been fighting for more than a year to get his money back.

Nardiello was having a dispute with an attorney about some legal bills. He wrote a check for $6,666.66 — a bit of dark humor on Nardiello’s side, which in retrospect might have been a bad omen — to the law firm.

“It was to send them as a message,” he said.

The check was dated Feb. 25, 2013, and hand-delivered to the law firm on that day, Nardiello said.

“When I was driving home, I started to feel again like I was getting ripped off,” he said.

So he decided to cancel the check, which was written from his checking account with the Kenilworth Wells Fargo, where he had been a customer for more than three years.

“I made the call to stop payment,” he said. “I was told it was done and received a paper confirmation also stating this. To my dismay, I later learned this was not the case.”

Before he knew there was trouble, everything seemed on the up-and-up.

Nardiello said the Wells Fargo rep who took his stop-payment order on Feb. 26 never mentioned anything about not being able to process his request. The rep told him it was a done deal, he said, and several days later he received written confirmation.

“On 2/26/2013 we processed your request to stop payment on the check or pre-authorized electronic transfer listed below,” the letter said, detailing the transaction.

Nardiello’s account was charged a $31 fee for the request.

But soon enough, Nardiello learned the money was no longer in his account. Despite the stop payment order and the written confirmation from Wells Fargo, Wells honored the check.

“I felt violated,” he said. “I felt I got ripped off by the bank.”

Read on.

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