Daily Archives: October 26, 2014

HSBC Bank Manager pressured female employee to sleep with executives, employees allege

According to lawsuits by two of her former subordinates, during her time as a senior vice-president and head of business development for North America, Eileen Hedges told another one of her subordinates, 27 year-old “Jane Doe,” to:

  • Dress provocatively on the job
  • “…have sex with male HSBC executives and clients at company-sponsored events”
  • Specifically, “have sex with an unnamed senior executive at the bank’s Mexico unit”

The boss of the year also allegedly:

  • “…falsely told co-workers that Doe was having sex with clients when they traveled to bank functions outside the U.S.”
  • “…told Doe about her own alleged extramarital affairs with HSBC executives.”1
  • “… attempted to pull down Doe’s blouse and expose her breasts in the presence of male HSBC employees.”

Read on.

Ocwen to hire independent firm to probe backdated foreclosure letters

Oct 24 (Reuters) – Ocwen Financial Corp said it was hiring an independent firm to investigate how the mortgage servicer had sent backdated letters to borrowers about loan modifications and foreclosures and the reason for the delay in fixing the issue.

Hundreds of thousands of borrowers facing foreclosure may have been harmed after they received letters from Ocwen with cure dates that had passed months earlier, New York Financial Services said on Tuesday.

Read on.

Wells Fargo CEO defends bank’s pay model

Of course, Mr. Stumpf can defend the bank’s pay model given the fact that he holds three titles, according the bank’s website:

John G. Stumpf

Chairman, President and CEO
Wells Fargo & Company

John G. Stumpf

Tyrel Oates wrote an email to the CEO asking the bank to put more of the bank’s profit toward boositng wages and seeking a $10,000 raise for all employees.

Stumpf said in the quarterly internal bank meeting that he wanted to address something that had been in the media recently regarding Wells Fargo’s compensation, though he didn’t specifically speak to the email from Oates.

Stumpf described the bank’s pay model as competitive, according to a source.

Stumpf spoke for about an hour during the internally televised online discussion, saying that 40,000 employees received a promotional raise last year.

Read on.

Fannie Mae Pays $170M To Clear Investors’ Subprime Suit

Law360, Los Angeles (October 24, 2014, 8:05 PM ET) — Fannie Mae has agreed to pay $170 million to shareholders to settle a consolidated class action alleging the federal mortgage giant misrepresented its exposure to subprime loans in the runup to the 2008 mortgage crisis, according to documents filed in New York federal court Friday.

Lead plaintiffs the Massachusetts Pension Reserves Investment Management Board and State Boston Retirement Board, representing a class of common stockholders, and Tennessee Consolidated Retirement System, representing a class of preferred stockholders, on Friday filed a motion for preliminary approval of the…

Source: Law360

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Another Deutsche Bank Banker And Former SEC Enforcement Attorney Commits Suicide

A senior Deutsche Bank regulatory lawyer has been found dead in New York after committing suicide, New York City officials said on Saturday.

Calogero Gambino, 41, was found on the morning of Oct. 20 at his home in the New York borough of Brooklyn and pronounced dead on the scene, according to New York City police.

Gambino was an associate general counsel and a managing director who worked for the German bank for 11 years, according to the Wall Street Journal, which first reported his death.

He had been closely involved in negotiating legal issues for Deutsche Bank such as a probe by regulators of banks over allegations they manipulated the Libor benchmark interest rate as well as currency markets.

Read on.

More from Zerohedge:

Back on January 26, a 58-year-old former senior executive at German investment bank behemoth Deutsche Bank, William Broeksmit, was found dead after hanging himself at his London home, and with that, set off an unprecedented series of banker suicides throughout the year which included former Fed officials and numerous JPMorgan traders.

Following a brief late summer spell in which there was little if any news of bankers taking their lives, asreported previously, the banker suicides returned with a bang when none other than the hedge fund partner of infamous former IMF head Dominique Strauss-Khan, Thierry Leyne, a French-Israeli entrepreneur, was found dead after jumping off the 23rd floor of one of the Yoo towers, a prestigious residential complex in Tel Aviv.

Just a few brief hours later the WSJ reported that yet another Deutsche Bank veteran has committed suicide, and not just anyone but the bank’s associate general counsel, 41 year old Calogero “Charlie” Gambino, who was found on the morning of Oct. 20, having also hung himself by the neck from a stairway banister, which according to the New York Police Department was the cause of death. We assume that any relationship to the famous Italian family carrying that last name is purely accidental.

Here is his bio from a recent conference which he attended:

Charlie J. Gambino is a Managing Director and Associate General Counsel in the Regulatory, Litigation and Internal Investigation group for Deutsche Bank in the Americas. Mr. Gambino served as a staff attorney in the United Securities and Exchange Commission’s Division of Enforcement from 1997 to 1999. He also was associated with the law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate Meagher & Flom from 1999 to 2003. He is a frequent speaker at securities law conferences. Mr. Gambino is a member of the American Bar Association and the Association of the Bar of the City of New York.

More from Wall Street on Parade:

Broeksmit’s name first emerged in yesterday’s Senate hearing as Senator Carl Levin, Chair of the Subcommittee, was questioning Satish Ramakrishna, the Global Head of Risk and Pricing for Global Prime Finance at Deutsche Bank Securities in New York. Ramakrishna was downplaying his knowledge of conversations about how the scheme was about changing short term gains into long term gains, denying that he had been privy to any conversations on the matter.

Levin than asked: “Did you ever have conversations with a man named Broeksmit?” Ramakrishna conceded that he had and that the fact that the scheme had a tax benefit had emerged in that conversation. Ramakrishna could hardly deny this as Levin had just released a November 7, 2008 transcript of a conversation between Ramakrishna and Broeksmit where the tax benefit had been acknowledged.

Another exhibit released by Levin was an August 25, 2009 email from William Broeksmit to Anshu Jain, with a cc to Ramakrishna, where Broeksmit went into copious detail on exactly what the scheme, internally called MAPS, made possible for the bank and for its client, the Renaissance Technologies hedge fund. (See Email from William Broeksmit to Anshu Jain, Released by the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations.)

At one point in the two-page email, Broeksmit reveals the massive risk the bank is taking on, writing: “Size of portfolio tends to be between $8 and $12 billion long and same amount of short. Maximum allowed usage is $16 billion x $16 billion, though this has never been approached.”

Broeksmit goes on to say that most of Deutsche’s money from the scheme “is actually made by lending them specials that we have on inventory and they pay far above the regular rates for that.”