Daily Archives: April 21, 2017

How many whistle-blowers did the Feds ignore? In the Wells Fargo case about 700.

Wow!

There were multiple red flags and missed signals at the OCC for years, the bank’s main regulator, the report said.

Most tellingly, bank examiners assigned to review Wells Fargo were aware of approximately 700 whistle-blower complaints related to “gaming of incentive plans” when they met with senior managers of the San Francisco-based bank in January 2010, the report said.

Carrie Tolstedt, who at the time headed the community banking division that was ground zero for the scandal was dismissive of the complaints, attributing them to a corporate culture that encouraged valid claims “which are then investigated and appropriately addressed,” the report said. Tolstedt also said the bank’s sales incentive programs were capped at 10% to 20% of bank workers’ total compensation “to keep motivation in check.” Tolstedt no longer works for the bank and has had to give back millions in compensation in connection with her role in the scandal.

According to the report, there was “no evidence that examiners required the bank to provide an analysis of the risks and controls, or investigated these issues further to identify the root cause and the appropriate supervisory actions needed.”

Additionally, Wells Fargo’s board of directors received regular reports dating back to 2005 indicating that the highest volume of internal ethics complaints at the bank involved “sales integrity violations.” The OCC’s Wells Fargo team received the same reports as early as 2010. However, the report said records don’t “indicate examiners investigated the root cause.”

Read on.

Florida AG also alleges widespread servicing failures at Ocwen, sues the bank

The state of Florida also sued Ocwen, which is based in West Palm Beach, along with the company’s subsidiaries Ocwen Loan Servicing and Ocwen Mortgage Servicing, for “mortgage servicing misconduct.”

According to the complaint filed by Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi and Florida Office of Financial Regulation Commissioner Drew Breakspear, Ocwen “harmed Floridians by filing illegal foreclosures, mishandling loan modifications, misapplying mortgage payments, failing to pay insurance premiums from escrow and collecting excessive fees.”

Florida’s complaint, filed in federal court in West Palm Beach, alleges violations of the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, the Florida Deceptive and Unfair Trade Practices Act and Chapter 494, Florida Statutes.

The complaint claims that Ocwen “failed to adequately perform basic mortgage servicing functions that resulted in widespread errors and financial harm to borrowers.”

In a release, Bondi’s office claims that despite a 2014 settlement between Ocwen, the CFPB, and 49 states that involved Ocwen providing $2 billion in consumer relief and paying a fine of $127.3 million for many of the same issues, Ocwen continued to fail in its duties as a mortgage servicer.

Read on.

CFPB sues Ocwen, alleges total failure of mortgage servicing process

Ocwen is still repeated offenders. When are the execs and board members get charged???

April 20, 2017 is turning into D-Day for Ocwen Financial.

On Thursday, a group of state banking regulators issued a series of cease-and-desist orders to Ocwen that prohibit the acquisition of new mortgage servicing rights and the origination of mortgage loans by Ocwen Loan Servicing, a subsidiary of Ocwen, until the company is “able to prove it can appropriately manage its consumer mortgage escrow accounts.”

But that’s only one front. Ocwen now has a much bigger fight on its hands – with theConsumer Financial Protection Bureau.

The CFPB announced Thursday that it is suing Ocwen Financial for “failing borrowers at every stage of the mortgage servicing process.”

According to the CFPB, its lawsuit alleges that Ocwen cost borrowers money, and in some cases, their homes, with its years of “widespread errors, shortcuts, and runarounds.”

In its lawsuit, the CFPB says that Ocwen “botched basic functions like sending accurate monthly statements, properly crediting payments, and handling taxes and insurance.”

The lawsuit also claims that also “illegally foreclosed on struggling borrowers, ignored customer complaints, and sold off the servicing rights to loans without fully disclosing the mistakes it made in borrowers’ records.”

The CFPB claims that it uncovered “substantial evidence that Ocwen has engaged in significant and systemic misconduct at nearly every stage of the mortgage servicing process.”

Read on.

Barclays Bank Gets Its Hands Slapped… and What Does That Change!!!??

Is getting its hands slapped a strong enough message? The latest in the bad bank sagas has the British bank, Barclays, red-faced. As it should.
CEO Jes Staley has been reprimanded for attempting to discover the identity of an internal company whistleblower. Mr. Staley stated that he was trying to protect a colleague from what he considered an unfair attack.
Mr. Staley took his inquiry so far he had Barclay employees reach out to postal inspectors in his attempt to discover who had anonymously mailed two letters to the Barclays board, which complained about the bank hiring a mid-level executive.
The resulting fallout will see Mr. Staley facing a significant pay cut plus regulatory probes.
The U.K. Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) has him under investigation which could result in a fine and a possible ban from the financial services industry if the FCA does not find him “fit and proper to lead the firm.”
Regards,
Richard